Indian IT Is A Boys Club Like Silicon Valley–But There Is More Hope

This is a piece I wrote at for Times of India which compares and contrasts Indian IT to Silicon Valley. Sadly, Indian IT is as sexist as the Valley is. But the tide is rising in India. When I moved to Silicon Valley from Pakistan, I did not expect that people would be so surprised my cofounder Sabika Nazim is a woman” said Faizan Buzdar, CEO of Convo.  He was also in disbelief at the public battles I have...

CNN International: The Silicon Valley Frat Club

The Silicon Valley Frat Club The Silicon Valley Frat ClubQuest Means Business|  July 2, 2014 Richard Quest talks to Vivek Wadhwa about misogyny in the tech industry. ...

Bloomberg TV Market Makers on Silicon Valley’s gender gap

June 3 (Bloomberg) –Stanford University Fellow Vivek Wadhwa discusses the Silicon Valley gender gap on Bloomberg Television’s “Market Makers.” (Source: Bloomberg) With Stephanie Ruhle and Erik Schatzker ...

Google, Silicon Valley must do more to hire female engineers

The technology industry has been fighting hard not to reveal race and gender diversity data — especially for its engineering teams — because it has a lot to be embarrassed about.  Data collected on Github showed that the percentage of female engineers at Qualcomm’s development center in Austin was 5.5 percent. At Dropbox it’s 6.3 percent, at Yelp 8.3 percent, at Airbnb 13.2 percent and 14.4 percent...

PBS Newshour: Google’s diversity record shows women and minorities left behind

In a new internal report released exclusively to the NewsHour, Google reveals that women and minorities have been largely left behind in their tech workforce. The disclosure comes amid increasing pressure for Silicon Valley companies to disclose their records on diversity. Gwen Ifill talks to Google’s Laszlo Bock, Vivek Wadhwa of Stanford University and Telle Whitney of the Anita Borg Institute. RELATED Google...

PBS Newshour: Fixing Google’s gender gap shouldn’t be so hard

“I agree we need to have a team that understands the product needs of more than just the young male user, but we just can’t find them,” said Ankur Jain at the first board meeting of his startup Humin in May 2013. This is the same explanation that all Silicon Valley companies — both large and small — provide, to justify their dearth of women technologists. RELATED CONTENT I advised the Humin...

Here’s what it actually takes to make it as an entrepreneur

A young male who was born to be an entrepreneur drops out from a computer-science program at a prestigious university.  He meets a powerful venture capitalist who is so enamored with his idea that he gives him millions of dollars to build his technology.  Then comes the multi-billion-dollar IPO. That’s the Hollywood version of Silicon Valley.  But it is as far from reality as is Disneyland.  Entrepreneurship...

Washington Post: Dropbox’s hiring practices explain its disappointing​ lack of female employees

“If someone came in right now and announced that the zombie apocalypse had just started outside, what would you do in the next hour? What is something that you’re geeky about? What is a superpower you would give to your best friend?” These are the types of questions that you could be asked if you apply for a job at Dropbox. Business Insider culled these and other quirky interview questions from a career...

Economic Times and LinkedIn: The Next Microsoft CEO And Lessons From Indians in Silicon Valley

When Vijay Vashee joined Microsoft in 1982 he was just one of two Indians at the 160-person company. It added several more recruits from India, mostly IITans, over the years. They held low-level technical positions. Vashee became the first Indian to break through Microsoft’s glass ceiling in 1988 when he was named General Manager for Microsoft Project. In 1992 he was asked to head the fledgling PowerPoint...

Washington Post: Enough is enough, Silicon Valley must end its elitism and arrogance

When computers were just for nerds and large corporations, Silicon Valley’s elite could get away with arrogance, insularity and sexism. They were building products for people that looked just like them.  The child geniuses inspired so much awe that their frat-boy behavior was a topic of amusement. Now technology is everywhere.  It is being used by everyone. Grandma downloads apps and communicates with junior...

Wall Street Journal: Keeping Women in the Tech Workforce

Once women are hired, the challenge for businesses becomes retaining them. A problem women commonly face when they join an industry is feeling marginalized and discriminated against. They leave the workforce midcareer. A report by the Anita Borg Institute noted that women leave technology companies at twice the rate at which men do. The key reasons are poor working conditions for women, lack of work–life...

Wall Street Journal: Steps to Increasing the Number of Women In Tech

Tech-industry executives say they have an extremely difficult time finding technical talent and that this shortage  hurts their company’s performance. They claim to look far and wide, including abroad, yet they overlook the lowest-hanging fruit: women and minorities. The percentage of women in engineering jobs is so embarrassingly low—in the single digits or low teens—that many tech companies refuse to...