My articles and research on ‘Featured’

MIT Technology Review: Laws and Ethics Can’t Keep Pace with Technology

Codes we live by, laws we follow, and computers that move too fast to care. Employers can get into legal trouble if they ask interviewees about their religion, sexual preference, or political affiliation. Yet they can use social media to filter out job applicants based on their beliefs, looks, and habits. Laws forbid lenders from discriminating on the basis of race, gender, and sexuality. Yet they can refuse...

The Economist debate: Goldman versus Google: A career on Wall Street or in Silicon Valley?

The  Buttonwood Gathering 2013, New York City. My really fun debate with Nobel laureate Robert J. Shiller.   For decades, the best and brightest minds from American business schools were attracted to Wall Street by the promise of high pay and prestige. But at least since the financial crisis, high-tech companies have become an increasingly appealing destination, and today, when Silicon Valley competes...

Washington Post: The triumph of genomic medicine is just beginning

“A Decade Later, Genetic Map Yields Few New Cures,” said a New York Times headline in June 2010.  It declared the failure of the $3 billion Human Genome Project and claimed that medicine had seen none of the benefits that Bill Clinton had promised in announcing the first draft of the human-genome sequence in 2000.  According to the article, geneticists were “almost back to square one in knowing...

Washington Post: How the United States is reinventing itself yet again

By Vivek Wadhwa and Alex Salkever. We have moved from the Great Recession to the Great Malaise. Despite massive government stimulus, the world’s largest and most advanced economy continues to limp sideways. Unemployment remains stubbornly high. Growth remains slow and prospects for employment growth remain bleak. Wages continue to stagnate. Recent college graduates and young professionals may well be the...

Washington Post: To inspire tomorrow’s great female engineers, we need better toys today

While her friends dressed Barbie dolls, Lucy Sanders designed and constructed buildings with Lincoln Logs, Tinkertoys, and playing cards.  She learned physics by playing with her slinky, and chemistry through her chemistry set.  Sanders says that the board games she played with her family taught her strategy, empathy, and how to win and lose.  Her parents did get her a Barbie — but she and her sister turned...

Financial Times: The digital world’s other equality problem

By Gillian Tett ‘There is not simply a gender digital divide but a widening socio-economic one too’ In recent days, Vivek Wadhwa, an American technology entrepreneur and pundit, has been helping to run a “hackathon” in the San Francisco area. But this did not comprise the usual computer coding and brainstorming sessions that occur at places such as Facebook or Google. There were no hoodie-wearing...

Washington Post: The future of work is rich in technology and drawbacks

We check e-mail as soon as we reach home, and sneak a peek at our inboxes along the way. We respond to calls, texts, and messages even while on vacation. At work, we use Cisco Telepresence or Skype to confer with colleagues all over the world. Companies often allow employees to work from home for one or two days a week; some let them live in remote locations. This has all become the norm. A decade ago, we...

Washington Post: It’s time for tech companies to fix the gender imbalance

View Photo Gallery —Columnist Vivek Wadhwa spotlights women he believes would do an exceptional job on the board of Twitter and other tech companies. Technology companies have few — if any — women on their boards.  They say this is because there is only a small pool of technical women to recruit from. Twitter, which recently filed for an IPO, has no women on its board of directors.  As do most Silicon...

Washington Post: Five myths about college debt

By John Etchemendy and Vivek Wadhwa The trillion-dollar student debt burden has spawned many debates about the value of college. Some argue that we educate too many young people. Indeed, average tuition costs have gone up faster than the rate of inflation. The cost of college today is, in inflation-adjusted terms, roughly double what it was in 1980. This creates legitimate concerns about the continued affordability...

Times of India: Affordable tablets will give the poor a voice

Watching the news from India, one could easily conclude that the country has become more corrupt and that its men have become more violent. Sadly, corruption and abuse of women aren’t new to India. Corruption is a legacy of the British Raj. Women all over the world are abused. What has changed is the ability of India’s normally docile middle class and its youth to speak up and demand change. That is what...

You’re Not Indestructible — Or Indispensable

On the flight back from Mexico, I started to feel a shooting pain in my left arm. It was as if electricity was passing through my veins. I ignored this — as I had ignored the back pain that I’d felt on the cruise to Cancún and the extreme nausea after climbing the Chichen Itza pyramid. After all, I was indestructible. I had just turned around my startup — which had run into trouble after the dot-com bubble...

Washington Post: America to immigrants: ‘Give me your tired, your poor’ but keep your entrepreneurs

Hardik Desai conceived a startup while he was studying for an MBA at the Fisher College of Business at Ohio State University (OSU) in 2008. Based on research that the university was conducting, Desai came up with a new way to diagnose a group of diseases including painful bladder syndrome and irritable bowel syndrome. He and his team wrote a business plan for a company they named IR Diagnostyx. The plan...