Vivek Wadhwa

  Tech Entrepreneur, Academic, Researcher, and Writer

Washington Post: 10 years after Facebook launched, social media is only beginning to shake up the world

When Harvard student Mark Zuckerberg launched thefacebook.com in Feb. 2004, even he could not imagine the forces it would unleash. His intent was to connect college students. Facebook, which is what this Web site rapidly evolved into, ended up connecting the world. To the children of this connected era, the world is one giant social network. They are not bound—as were previous generations of humans—by what...

Economic Times and LinkedIn: The Next Microsoft CEO And Lessons From Indians in Silicon Valley

When Vijay Vashee joined Microsoft in 1982 he was just one of two Indians at the 160-person company. It added several more recruits from India, mostly IITans, over the years. They held low-level technical positions. Vashee became the first Indian to break through Microsoft’s glass ceiling in 1988 when he was named General Manager for Microsoft Project. In 1992 he was asked to head the fledgling PowerPoint...

Washington Post: Enough is enough, Silicon Valley must end its elitism and arrogance

When computers were just for nerds and large corporations, Silicon Valley’s elite could get away with arrogance, insularity and sexism. They were building products for people that looked just like them.  The child geniuses inspired so much awe that their frat-boy behavior was a topic of amusement. Now technology is everywhere.  It is being used by everyone. Grandma downloads apps and communicates with junior...

Wall Street Journal: Keeping Women in the Tech Workforce

Once women are hired, the challenge for businesses becomes retaining them. A problem women commonly face when they join an industry is feeling marginalized and discriminated against. They leave the workforce midcareer. A report by the Anita Borg Institute noted that women leave technology companies at twice the rate at which men do. The key reasons are poor working conditions for women, lack of work–life...

Wall Street Journal: Steps to Increasing the Number of Women In Tech

Tech-industry executives say they have an extremely difficult time finding technical talent and that this shortage  hurts their company’s performance. They claim to look far and wide, including abroad, yet they overlook the lowest-hanging fruit: women and minorities. The percentage of women in engineering jobs is so embarrassingly low—in the single digits or low teens—that many tech companies refuse to...

LinkedIn: Entrepreneurship is a Roller Coaster, Not a Cruise

Listen to the tales of successful company founders and you will get the impression that they sailed smoothly to success. They’ll lead you to believe that they did everything right and made it big because of their smarts and perhaps a little luck. Don’t be fooled. Entrepreneurship is never like that. You fail constantly, suffer setbacks at every turn, and live with the fear that you won’t be able to make...

Washington Post: How the United States is reinventing itself yet again

By Vivek Wadhwa and Alex Salkever. We have moved from the Great Recession to the Great Malaise. Despite massive government stimulus, the world’s largest and most advanced economy continues to limp sideways. Unemployment remains stubbornly high. Growth remains slow and prospects for employment growth remain bleak. Wages continue to stagnate. Recent college graduates and young professionals may well be the...

Washington Post: 2013 was a more amazing year than you think

If you go by the headlines, the iPhone 5S and Google Glass were the big technology stories of 2013, and Twitter’s IPO was the event of the year. The coverage of Glass focused mostly on its privacy implications — not its ability to change the world. And iPhone and Twitter were just more of the same. So we could end the year really disappointed because nothing dramatic seems to have happened on the technology...

Times of India and LinkedIn: Why I Have Become Pessimistic About Indian I.T.

When Wall Street Journal and Forbes published articles, a few years ago, predicting the demise of Indian IT, I responded in BusinessWeek that they were dead wrong. I said that the outsourcing market had a long way to go before it peaked; rising salaries and attrition rates were not a cause for long-term concern; and Indian IT would soon become a $100 billion industry. I was, of course, right. Now I am...

Wall Street Journal: Crowdsourcing is Overtaking Outsourcing

Outsourcing was the Bogeyman of the 90s. Protectionists portrayed it as an evil that would take American jobs away. Yes, some jobs did go offshore as people feared, but it made the global economic pie grow bigger. Whether you agree or disagree, and regardless of whether you love outsourcing or hate it, much more lies ahead. The nature of work is itself changing—it is democratizing.  Outsourcing is being superseded...

Wall Street Journal: Come Clean When Things Go Wrong

The best way of dealing with the press, customers, and critics is to come clean when things go wrong and admit when you make a mistake. We are humans, and no one expects us to be perfect. Even though you may get some negative press, it won’t be anything like the alternative. As well, you will build a level of trust that pays long-term dividends. I learned this the hard way when I was an entrepreneur. In my...

Inc. Magazine: Where Are The Women Innovators? BY LEIGH BUCHANAN

Male academics don’t inspire female innovators. Female innovators inspire female innovators. So when Vivek Wadhwa sought to highlight women’s struggles and achievements in the innovation economy, he teamed with journalist Farai Chideya to solicit stories from women around the world. Wadhwa, whose CV includes Stanford, Duke, and Singularity University, took a break from editing the book to discuss...