Vivek Wadhwa

  Tech Entrepreneur, Academic, Researcher, and Writer

Forbes: Twitter Has Taken A Good Step Forward, But Needs More Than One Female Director

Twitter has garnered worldwide attention for its bad corporate governance practices and itsinappropriate response to criticism.  The company needs to be congratulated, however, for announcing that it is adding Marjorie Scardino to its board.  Scardino is former chief executive of publishing giant Pearson PSO -0.42% and is highly accomplished.  She is known for being outspoken. Scardino might well not...

Washington Post: To inspire tomorrow’s great female engineers, we need better toys today

While her friends dressed Barbie dolls, Lucy Sanders designed and constructed buildings with Lincoln Logs, Tinkertoys, and playing cards.  She learned physics by playing with her slinky, and chemistry through her chemistry set.  Sanders says that the board games she played with her family taught her strategy, empathy, and how to win and lose.  Her parents did get her a Barbie — but she and her sister turned...

Washington Post: Twitter’s addition of Marjorie Scardino is a great move, but more needs done

Twitter made an important announcement Dec. 5: that it was adding a woman, Marjorie Scardino, to its board. This is significant because Twitter has become a poster child for the sexism and arrogance that pervades Silicon Valley. This appointment sends a signal to the corporate world that behavior that was considered acceptable in the ’50s is no longer so — that there must be diversity. Scardino is a great...

Washington Post: We’ve failed on immigration reform. Here are five ways to get back on track

Immigration reform has been a quagmire, largely because of demands by Democrats for all or nothing. They would not agree to increase the numbers of visas for skilled workers unless the Republicans agreed to legalize the more than 10 million immigrants who are in the country without documentation — and did it on their terms. Democrats also allowed special-interest groups such as Big Labor to craft a complex...

Forbes: Anyone Anywhere Can Build the Next Google—There Are No Barriers

A common excuse that entrepreneurs make for not being able to innovate is the lack of venture capital in their region. They argue that because investors are not ready to take a risk, they can’t succeed. Policy makers all over the world make the same excuse. Access to venture capital may have been a problem as recently as a decade ago, but is no longer an inhibitor. The cost of developing world-changing startups...

Financial Times: The digital world’s other equality problem

By Gillian Tett ‘There is not simply a gender digital divide but a widening socio-economic one too’ In recent days, Vivek Wadhwa, an American technology entrepreneur and pundit, has been helping to run a “hackathon” in the San Francisco area. But this did not comprise the usual computer coding and brainstorming sessions that occur at places such as Facebook or Google. There were no hoodie-wearing...

Washington Post: The future of work is rich in technology and drawbacks

We check e-mail as soon as we reach home, and sneak a peek at our inboxes along the way. We respond to calls, texts, and messages even while on vacation. At work, we use Cisco Telepresence or Skype to confer with colleagues all over the world. Companies often allow employees to work from home for one or two days a week; some let them live in remote locations. This has all become the norm. A decade ago, we...

LinkedIn: Chinese Can Innovate–But China Can’t

The Economist asked me to comment on a debate about whether China can innovate. Here is my response. Feel free to weigh in below and vote on Economist’s website. China produces more than a million engineering graduates a year—which is seven times as many as America. It is second in academic publications to America and by 2015 will file more patents annually than America. China has already invested...

LinkedIn Influencers: Calling All Engineers: Please Tell Us Your Gender Numbers

One of the technology industry’s most serious shortcomings is that it leaves out women and some minorities. I have written a lot about the dearth of women and why this is animportant issue. I am also crowdcreating a book, Innovating Women, on how to fix this imbalance. In a nutshell, we need to do this for the economy and to boost innovation. Culture, values, and ethics flow from the top to the bottom...

Washington Post: Google — not Goldman Sachs — deserves our best minds

Collateralized debt obligations, credit default swaps, and structured investment vehicles are some of the greatest innovations created by the financial industry in recent times. What did this get us? Subprime loans, the housing bubble, and the financial meltdown.  And with high-frequency trading and other technology gimmicks that investment banks are increasingly using to skim money off the top of stock trading...

Wall Street Journal: There’s No Age Requirement for Innovation

 A common belief in the Silicon Valley VC community is that if you are over 35 years old, you are too old to innovate. The stereotypical successful entrepreneur is Mark Zuckerberg—the young college dropout who dreamed up a crazy idea while in his dorm room. As I have explained in previous articles, this stereotype is deeply flawed. The fact is that you are never too old to innovate.  As well, the wunderkinder...

Washington Post: It’s time for tech companies to fix the gender imbalance

View Photo Gallery —Columnist Vivek Wadhwa spotlights women he believes would do an exceptional job on the board of Twitter and other tech companies. Technology companies have few — if any — women on their boards.  They say this is because there is only a small pool of technical women to recruit from. Twitter, which recently filed for an IPO, has no women on its board of directors.  As do most Silicon...